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13 Bordeston Court, The Ham
Brentford, Middlesex, TW8 8HW
United Kingdom

+44 (0)7729 845908

Miniaturist creating historically authentic miniatures for 18th century, Georgian, Regency and Colonial dolls house settings in 1/12th (one inch) scale. Beautiful silks and hand-printed wallpapers for 18th-century dollshouses, doll houses, baby houses. @homewithmrshgth

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Warner Textile Archive

The Warner Textile Archive holds England’s second largest collection of flat textiles and narrates the rich history of a great British industry, from its roots in the late 18th century to the flourishing success of Warner & Sons in the 20th century.  

The Archive is located in Braintree, Essex, and holds an inspiring and unique collection of more than 60,000 textiles, 10,000 paper designs, pattern books, rule papers, record books, print blocks, photographs and documentary material. Elegant velvets and brocades are preserved alongside vibrant printed works, all reflecting the stylistic currents of their time.

The collection also casts light on the textile production process; print blocks, photographs and Jacquard cards provide an insight into the weaving and printing techniques used by generations of Warner employees. It is housed in an original Warner & Sons mill building, now grade II listed. The old power loom shed was bought and restored to conservation standard to store and display the company’s remarkable legacy.

The Warner family’s connections with the textile industry date back at least to the late 17th century, when William Warner worked as a scarlet dyer in Spitalfields, London. Following William’s death in 1712, his sons and grandsons carried on the family business. Amongst William’s descendants was Benjamin Warner (b. 1828), who was exposed to the industry from an early age, building Jacquard loom harnesses. He later attended evening classes at the Spitalfields School of Design and developed the business into silk weaving. The silk weaving business was initially based in Spitalfields before moving to the New Mills in Braintree in 1895, in which building the Braintree District Museums Trust conserves the collection today.

At Home with Mrs Hogarth licenses most of the designs we use in our range from the Archive.

The Archive opens regularly for exhibitions and tours, has a beautiful gift shop and arranges a programme of events throughout the year exhibition. For information visit their website at www.warnertextilearchive.co.uk (opens in a new window).

  Photographs of ledgers, the exterior, the racking and the  logo of the Warner Textile Archive are all Copyright © 2015 Warner Textile Archive / Braintree District Museum Trust Limited  and are reproduced here by their kind permission

 

Photographs of ledgers, the exterior, the racking and the  logo of the Warner Textile Archive are all Copyright © 2015 Warner Textile Archive / Braintree District Museum Trust Limited  and are reproduced here by their kind permission